Extreme example of income inequality

In the midst of global climate change protests and calls to action, we have this…the biggest collection of super yachts ever, at the annual Monaco Yacht Show. Massive resources devoted to nothing more than part time play things of those with more money than they know what to do with. Over four billion dollars worth of these behemoths. Machines consuming vast natural resources in their construction and operation.

Fixing climate change means our lifestyles will have to change….and I can’t think of any example as stark as this one.

Project Drawdown

A friend recently made me aware of a website for a group called Project Drawdown. It’s interesting…it’s addressing the concerns of those who want to do something to fight global warming but maybe aren’t sure where to start. On a larger scale though, it’s identifying all the things we can be doing to reach that drawdown point…where greenhouse gas emissions start decreasing for a change.

In their own words, “Project Drawdown is the first effort to measure and project the collective impact of a broad range of solutions if implemented at scale. Rather than focusing on a single solution or sector of solutions, Project Drawdown has done the math on what humanity is capable of achieving with the broad range of tools already in use around the globe.”

Politicians would be wise to draw from this knowledge base to draft their own proposals for fighting climate change, if they wish to attract the interest of voters who care about this issue. The breadth of ideas here is inspiring.

2019 dirty dozen list

The “dirty dozen” list, of pesticide residue in produce, is out. As always…if you’re going to eat any of these, buy organic wherever possible!!! These fruits and veggies are the ones that typically have the highest concentrations of pesticides present.

Here’s the list, starting with the worst offender, strawberries:

  1. Strawberries
  2. Spinach
  3. Kale
  4. Nectarines
  5. Apples
  6. Grapes
  7. Peaches
  8. Cherries
  9. Pears
  10. Tomatoes
  11. Celery
  12. Hot peppers

Read more here. Or view the full list here.

Microplastics…they’ve made their way into your kitchen now

Microplastics are just what the name implies….tiny bits of plastic from a myriad of sources, like washing fleece material in a washing machine for example. It’s been described as a problem affecting the food chain in oceans, but guess what? Around 90 percent of table salt brands were found to contain these (since I had of our salt comes from the ocean). So, we’re all ingesting these, not just marine life. Unfortunately, no one’s really sure what health risks, of any, this poses. Read this article for more on this:

apple.news/AJXMEllyITvutRKlwht1myQ

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