Bug in Kindle app update for iOS delete’s entire library (oops)

screen-shot-2013-02-27-at-9-28-06-amThe latest Kindle app update for your favorite iOS devices erases users’ entire freakin’ Kindle library.  That’s not a BUG, people, that’s a major F.U.  I mean, wow.  Really…don’t they test this stuff beforehand?

It doesn’t eliminate your access to prior purchases…but it does require you to re-register your iOS device as a new device, and re-download content you want.  If you’re like me, that would mean picking and choosing from many, many previous purchases and free downloads.  Royal PITA.

Amazon states on their iTunes page:

Note: There is a known issue with this update. If you are an existing Kindle for iOS user, we recommend you do not install this update at this time.

(via TechCrunch)

Avoid whales with your ship – there’s an app for that

whalealert-02.jpg.492x0_q85_crop-smartWe’re probably all tired of hearing ‘there’s an app for that’, but it’s just too cool in this case…there’s an iPad app to help ship captains avoid whales in some shipping routes.  Ship/whale collisions are a big deal for the whales, especially endangered Right Whales (not such a big deal for the ships).  This app only covers areas close to shore where detection buoys have been set up, but still, it’s a start, and a cool one at that.

(via Treehugger)

Invisibility cloak from TED2013

This is a far cry from a true invisibility cloak, but what assistant professor Baile Zhang showed off at TED2013 in Long Beach recently is one big step closer to that ideal.  Check out the video for a quick demo.  It’s made from two pieces of optical crystals (calcite) cemented together.  Lots of questions remain about this (such as how close the object needs to be to be ‘hidden’…but it’s pretty cool nonetheless.

A physical mechanism linking extreme weather with climate change

Scientists have identified exactly how it is that climate change may increase the likelihood of extreme weather events around the globe.  You can read the full details here, but the gist of it is that there are normally what is, in essence, atmospheric ‘waves’ oscillating between the artic and tropic regions, which help mix things up.  During recent extreme weather events, those waves were more or less frozen in place, something which climate change may make more likely as the planet is not heating uniformly (the poles heat more than the tropical areas, hence there’s less temperature different between them to drive the oscillations).